Timeless Travels Magazine Review

Opening spread of the Castle Corridor article.

Timeless Travels magazine is a cutting-edge publication combining narratives of personal travel with in-depth history. It provides a reader with travelogues, historical narratives, reviews of museum exhibits and tours, and the latest news on archaeological excavations and their significance. The magazine is a must-read for anyone interested in history, travel, or the world at-large and… Continue reading Timeless Travels Magazine Review

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Categorized as Travel

The Hadrianic Tondi on the Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine, dedicated on 25 July 315 CE, stands in Rome between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill, at what was once the beginning of the Via Triumphalis. As described on its attic inscription, it commemorates Constantine’s victory at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312 CE over the tyrant Maxentius… Continue reading The Hadrianic Tondi on the Arch of Constantine

Object in Focus: Francois Vase

Ajax and Achilles, Francois Vase. Image © Kealor.

In an effort to share more of our favourite ancient objects from around the world, Ancient History Encyclopedia staff have taken a closer look at some really amazing objects or structures. Today’s Object in Focus is the Francois Vase.

Festivals in Ancient Greece and Rome: 9 Fascinating Facts

Festivals in ancient Greece and Rome were important periods of time during which people performed “activities that are most often thought of as communications with the superhuman world.” Marked by a variety of unique cultural rituals and traditions, festival days stood in stark contrast to ordinary life in ancient Greece and Rome. Processions, sacrifices, athletic… Continue reading Festivals in Ancient Greece and Rome: 9 Fascinating Facts

Object in Focus: Antonine Wall

On the north-west frontier of the Roman Empire, the Antonine wall was built c. 140 CE on the orders of Antoninus Pius. The wall stretched from the Firth of Forth to the Clyde estuary. Photo © Mark Cartwright.

In an effort to share more of our favourite ancient objects from around the world, each month Ancient History Encyclopedia staff are going to take a closer look at some really amazing objects or buildings. Today’s Object in Focus is the Antonine Wall.

Roman Villa Borg

Ruins of a grand Roman countryside villa (villa rustica) were discovered by a local school teacher at the end of the 19th century outside the village of Borg in the municipality of Perl (Germany). The villa consisted of three wings covering an area of more than 7.5 hectares. The complex was excavated in the late… Continue reading Roman Villa Borg

Roman Gladiator: 11 Facts You May Not Know

About two thousand years ago, fifty thousand people filled the Colosseum in Rome to participate in one of the most fascinating and violent events to ever take place in the ancient world. Gladiator fights were the phenomenon of their day – a celebration of courage, endurance, bravery, and violence against a backdrop of fame, fortune,… Continue reading Roman Gladiator: 11 Facts You May Not Know

May 2017 Museum Listings

Every month, Ancient History Encyclopedia will share news about select museum exhibitions and events of interest to our global audience via AHetc. Exhibitions are arranged in alphabetical order by geographical location and region within this post: the Americas, United Kingdom, Europe/Middle East, and East Asia/Oceania. Here is a taste of what is on show at… Continue reading May 2017 Museum Listings

Italica: Roman city in Santiponce

Italica is a well-preserved Roman city located in modern-day Santiponce, 9 kilometres north of Seville in Spain. The city was founded in 206 BC during the Second Punic War (218-202) when the Roman commander Publius Cornelius Scipio settled his Italian veterans on this site following a victory at the Battle of Ilipa. Although the nearby town of Hispalis… Continue reading Italica: Roman city in Santiponce