Egyptian Relations with Canaan

Canaanite amulet of a schematic nude goddess in Egyptian style Tell el-Ajjul, 15th century BCE, gold Collection of Israel Antiquities Authority Photo © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, by Elie Posner.

The Israel Museum in Jerusalem is giving the public an unprecedented opportunity to explore ancient Egyptian relations with Canaan during the second millennium BCE in Pharaoh in Canaan: The Untold Story. This exhibition presents more than 680 objects, which reflect the rich cross-fertilization of ritual practices and aesthetic vocabularies between these two distinct cultures. In… Continue reading Egyptian Relations with Canaan

Visiting the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London

Cartonnage mummy masks. Wealthier ancient Egyptians were keen to prepare for the afterlife. A mummy case was important part for the funerary equipment. After the body was embalmed and wrapped, in a linen bandage, the mummy was placed in case of coffin. Egyptians of a high social status often had lavish and colorful cases. With thanks to the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology. Photo © Osama S. M. Amin.

During my last visit to London, I resided in a hotel at Gower Street of Bloomsbury. By chance, I discovered a hidden gem within the heart of University College London while surfing Google. It was located just few minutes away from me: the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology. The Museum lies at Malet Place, hidden away from… Continue reading Visiting the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London

Ancient Mediterranean Funerary Art

This post is part of a series of image posts Ancient History et cetera will post each month. Today’, it is all about ancient funerary art! All ancient cultures had varying and extensive beliefs about life and death. They also had elaborate burial rituals performed at death. These rituals ensured safe travel to the afterlife, so that the dead are… Continue reading Ancient Mediterranean Funerary Art

The Tomb Chapel of Nebamun

The British Museum in London is rim-filled with treasures. Not only does its Mesopotamian section blow your mind, but you can continue and wander through time, enjoying the ancient Greeks and Romans. Almost hidden, at the back of the museum on the first floor, is the Egyptian section. It’s filled with the usual mummies and papyri,… Continue reading The Tomb Chapel of Nebamun